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Honda lawn mower sets new Guinness World record| ZigWheels.com

The Honda Mean Mower has broken a Guinness World Record to become the world’s fastest lawn mower

 

 

Honda Mean Mower

 

 

 

Mowing the lawn will no longer be a tedious task – thanks to Honda’s 1,000cc Mean Mower which has broken the Guinness World Records (GWR) Title for the fastest lawn mower. This new mower has set a new world record of 185kmph in Tarragona, Spain.

 

The Mean Mower’s speed was measured through a 100-metre speed trap, overseen by official timers. To meet the GWR regulations the lawn mower had to record the same run, in both directions, within an hour – with the average speed taken of these two runs. Additional record-setting requirements were the need to cut grass and look like a lawnmower.

 

Two electric motors on the cutter deck, spinning 3mm steel cutting cable at 4,000rpm ensured the mower passed the cutting grass requirement. The mower can cut grass at around 25kmph, more than double the flat-out speed of the original HF2620 from which it is derived. The mower also features a custom-made paddle shift six-speed gear system. Additionally it has a custom-made Cobra sports seat, a Scorpion exhaust system and a steering rack taken from a Morris Minor.

 

“The original brief for Mean Mower was to create the world’s fastest lawnmower – and now it officially is, by some distance!” ays Kate Saxton, PR Communications Manager for Honda Motor Europe.  “We are all delighted to hold a Guinness World Records title and we’d like to thank everyone who was involved in what has been a challenging yet incredibly exciting project,” he adds.

 

The Mean Mower was designed and built by Honda (UK)’s British Touring Car Championship (BTCC) partner, Team Dynamics. The team re-engineered a Honda HF2620 Lawn Tractor from the ground-up, adding an all-new fabricated chassis, custom-made from 4130 chromoly, to provide a strong, safe but very light platform. A 1,000cc engine from a Honda VTR Firestorm was used, along with a bespoke suspension and wheels from an ATV.

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It would be impossible for this updated Diavel to match the impact of the original, launched only three years ago. Few bikes have been as controversial. Internet forums and magazine letters pages blazed with complaints that the Diavel was ugly, and that Ducati was betraying its sporting heritage by building a cruiser.

Despite that, Ducati’s boldness in creating the dramatically styled and cleverly engineered Diavel was rewarded when almost everybody who rode it came back smiling; marvelling at the unique way that it combined a relaxed riding position and fat back tyre with thrilling acceleration and improbably agile handling. It looked like a cruiser, performed like a superbike and has since sold respectably well, despite being far from cheap.

The updates are aimed at improving comfort and low-speed performance. That brutalist styling is retained. In fact it is exaggerated slightly, by larger air scoops on either side of the fuel tank. Other changes include an LED headlight and indicators, reshaped seat and a new exhaust system with “slash-cut” silencers.

The engine is still a 1,198cc, liquid-cooled, eight-valve V-twin, but is updated with twin spark plugs per cylinder, new camshafts and a higher compression ratio. The maximum output remains 160bhp, roughly 20bhp up on the similar unit in the new Monster 1200, but low-rev torque is improved.

Ducati claims a revised injection system gives a more refined feel. That may well be true, although I’d need a back-to-back test with the old version to confirm it. What is certain is that the revamped Diavel is not just one of the quickest bikes around but also one of the most exciting.

For such an aggressively styled bike it is rider-friendly, especially in the softest of the three riding modes, Urban, which limits power output to 100bhp. But if you press the indicator button to select Touring or Sport mode, then crack open the throttle, you’ll need to hold on tight as the Ducati thunders forward at a rate that even the firm’s super-sports 1199 Panigale would struggle to match. At 205kg dry the Diavel is heavier but its extra length helps keep the front wheel down.

The Diavel’s upright riding position is comfortable, too, at least until wind pressure intrudes, long before the maximum speed is reached. The low seat aids manoeuvrability in town.

On the launch, the only engine-related drawback was the otherwise slick six-speed gearbox’s occasional reluctance to find neutral, possibly due to the bike’s very low mileage.

If the engine is powerful and refined, the chassis impresses even more, because a bike with cruiser-like steering geometry and a huge rear tyre really shouldn’t handle so well. Inevitably the Diavel feels slightly cumbersome in the tightest of hairpins, but in most bends it’s remarkably composed.

The ride quality is very acceptable, despite the relatively short-travel suspension; and the Diavel has none of the cornering clearance limitations of many cruisers. It also has outstanding braking power, due to its stability-enhancing length allied to the ferocious bite of Brembo Monobloc calipers, allied to an excellent ABS system.

Detailing is mostly good, especially on the more expensive Carbon model tested here. This gains a carbon-fibre front mudguard and tank and seat covers, along with forged aluminium wheels and different silencers. Neat components shared by Carbon and standard Diavels include the pillion footrests and grab-rail, which retract out of sight when not required.

Those parts and the generously padded dual-seat help make the Ducati respectably practical. Its fuel capacity is a modest 17 litres but most owners will improve on the sub-100-mile range dictated by the mountainous launch route, which dragged consumption below 30mpg. At least the tank-top instrument panel now has a fuel gauge. Accessories including a screen and panniers can add versatility.

But most prospective owners will be attracted by the Diavel Carbon’s basic charms; especially by its unique blend of style, acceleration and handling ability, which goes a long way to justifying its substantial price of £16,995. These latest updates won’t make the oddball Ducati popular with every motorcyclist, even if the controversy that surrounded the original model has passed. But the Diavel is a little more refined, and every bit as exhilarating as ever.

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It would be impossible for this updated Diavel to match the impact of the original, launched only three years ago. Few bikes have been as controversial. Internet forums and magazine letters pages blazed with complaints that the Diavel was ugly, and that Ducati was betraying its sporting heritage by building a cruiser.

Despite that, Ducati’s boldness in creating the dramatically styled and cleverly engineered Diavel was rewarded when almost everybody who rode it came back smiling; marvelling at the unique way that it combined a relaxed riding position and fat back tyre with thrilling acceleration and improbably agile handling. It looked like a cruiser, performed like a superbike and has since sold respectably well, despite being far from cheap.

The updates are aimed at improving comfort and low-speed performance. That brutalist styling is retained. In fact it is exaggerated slightly, by larger air scoops on either side of the fuel tank. Other changes include an LED headlight and indicators, reshaped seat and a new exhaust system with “slash-cut” silencers.

The engine is still a 1,198cc, liquid-cooled, eight-valve V-twin, but is updated with twin spark plugs per cylinder, new camshafts and a higher compression ratio. The maximum output remains 160bhp, roughly 20bhp up on the similar unit in the new Monster 1200, but low-rev torque is improved.

Ducati claims a revised injection system gives a more refined feel. That may well be true, although I’d need a back-to-back test with the old version to confirm it. What is certain is that the revamped Diavel is not just one of the quickest bikes around but also one of the most exciting.

For such an aggressively styled bike it is rider-friendly, especially in the softest of the three riding modes, Urban, which limits power output to 100bhp. But if you press the indicator button to select Touring or Sport mode, then crack open the throttle, you’ll need to hold on tight as the Ducati thunders forward at a rate that even the firm’s super-sports 1199 Panigale would struggle to match. At 205kg dry the Diavel is heavier but its extra length helps keep the front wheel down.

The Diavel’s upright riding position is comfortable, too, at least until wind pressure intrudes, long before the maximum speed is reached. The low seat aids manoeuvrability in town.

On the launch, the only engine-related drawback was the otherwise slick six-speed gearbox’s occasional reluctance to find neutral, possibly due to the bike’s very low mileage.

If the engine is powerful and refined, the chassis impresses even more, because a bike with cruiser-like steering geometry and a huge rear tyre really shouldn’t handle so well. Inevitably the Diavel feels slightly cumbersome in the tightest of hairpins, but in most bends it’s remarkably composed.

The ride quality is very acceptable, despite the relatively short-travel suspension; and the Diavel has none of the cornering clearance limitations of many cruisers. It also has outstanding braking power, due to its stability-enhancing length allied to the ferocious bite of Brembo Monobloc calipers, allied to an excellent ABS system.

Detailing is mostly good, especially on the more expensive Carbon model tested here. This gains a carbon-fibre front mudguard and tank and seat covers, along with forged aluminium wheels and different silencers. Neat components shared by Carbon and standard Diavels include the pillion footrests and grab-rail, which retract out of sight when not required.

Those parts and the generously padded dual-seat help make the Ducati respectably practical. Its fuel capacity is a modest 17 litres but most owners will improve on the sub-100-mile range dictated by the mountainous launch route, which dragged consumption below 30mpg. At least the tank-top instrument panel now has a fuel gauge. Accessories including a screen and panniers can add versatility.

But most prospective owners will be attracted by the Diavel Carbon’s basic charms; especially by its unique blend of style, acceleration and handling ability, which goes a long way to justifying its substantial price of £16,995. These latest updates won’t make the oddball Ducati popular with every motorcyclist, even if the controversy that surrounded the original model has passed. But the Diavel is a little more refined, and every bit as exhilarating as ever.

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Meet the Night Wolves – Putin’s Hell’s Angels – Telegraph

The Night Wolves are Russia’s largest motorbike club, with over 5,000 members.

Fiercely patriotic, they believe that “wherever the Night Wolves are, that should be considered Russia”.

On Saturday, the Night Wolves organised a mass ride from the northeast of Ukraine through the Russian speaking eastern regions to the Crimea.

They wanted to hand out supplies to pro-Russian militia forces there.

A member of the club’s local chapter said: “We don’t want what happened in Kiev to happen here. Nazis and bandits have seized power there. And if we have to fight, we’ll fight with everything we can get our hands on.”

The Night Wolves formed during Perestroika in1980s Russia as a counter-Soviet group idolising rock music and motorbikes.

Even today, they claim to reject all laws, written and unwritten, and all political or religious movements.

Vladimir Putin, then Russia’s Prime Minister, with Alexander Zaldostanov, the leader of the Night Wolves, in 2010 (AFP/GETTY)

So it’s odd that Russian President Vladimir Putin has struck up an enduring friendship with the group’s leader, Alexander Zaldostanov, a man nicknamed ‘The Surgeon’.

Indeed, Mr Putin’s links to the group are considerable enough that he was accidentally put on a blacklist by Finnish authorities, banning him from entering the country.

Finnish authorities later said it had been a big mistake and they had ordered the banning order to be removed.

Mr Putin first met the bike group in 2009 – a stunt that his detractors viewed as another of his macho photo opportunities.

But Mr Putin’s links to the group seem sincere.

Mr Putin was once four hours late for a meeting with former Ukrainian leader Viktor Yanukovych because he had been touring the Crimea with Mr Zaldostanov.

Last year, Mr Putin awarded Mr Zaldostanov with an Order of Honour for his “active work in the patriotic upbringing of the young”.

In return, Mr Zaldostanov has praised the President for his attempts to “restore Russia’s greatness”.

In 2011 a leather-clad Putin led a column of Night Wolves into the Russian city of Novorossiysk for a bike show.

The group’s rallies and rides have become an increasing show of Russian soft power in Eastern Europe.

Following feminist group Pussy Riot’s ‘punk prayer’ in a Moscow cathedral, the Night Wolves offered to guard Orthodox cathedrals against any further ‘hooliganism’.

The group’s political links have also led to clashes with rival motorbike groups.

One of their members was killed last November in a shoot-out with the Three Roads club.

The Three Roads’s leader, Yebgeny Vorobyev, said the shoot-out had begun over his group’s decision to end ties with the wolves in favour of a U.S. based club called the Bandidos.

He added that the Wolves had become too politicised.

 

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Queensland Police Harass Harley Biker Over 20 Times in 2 Years!

Police harassment has hit an all time low in the town of Queensland, Australia. It has finally become evident to motorcycle enthusiast from all over. This after a viral video was posted of a biker being obviously harassed by multiple police for wearing his clubs vest. To say this is upsetting would be a major understatement. One of our fans sent a link to this video a couple days back, and it got the guys in an uproar. We watched the whole video, and shared the same looks of disgust for the entire clip. Harley Davidson rider James Evans, who has been stopped a startling 21 times since buying his fatboy motorcycle in 2012, finally filmed his latest incident. Queensland Police Media have responded to Jamie’s video saying riders and the public have “nothing to fear” from the increased police presence. Jamie is a member of the Misfits Social Motorcycle Club and wears a “Misfits” vest when he rides. “I’ve been advised by the police on many occasions to take the vest off, but I will always wear my vest. I’m proud of it,” he says. However, the harassment has now got to the stage where he says he can’t take his nine-year-old son for a ride. “How do you explain to a nine-year-old that police aren’t bad but I ride a bike so they see me as being bad. He’d lose any respect he has for the police,” he says. Despite the grilling by several police, Jamie filmed the whole incident and managed to keep his sense of humor

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Ozbiker – International bikers give Queensland a miss

Queensland’s police say the states growing infamy as a no-go zone for bikers has gone global, killing off visits by overseas bikers and reducing local clubs to ‘furtive’ meetings in homes or over the internet.

They claim the local heat on bikers has ruined a key networking opportunity for Gold Coast members of the Mongols with US clubmates, and is also warding off trips by foreign Hells Angels and Bandidos.

A police source said overseas bikers were wary of the prospect of “too much scrutiny at customs and they’re living in fear they’re going to get here and are not going to able to get home”.

Deputy Police Commissioner Brett Pointing said the reported combined feedback among bikers, interstate and overseas, was “keep away from Queensland”.

“Crooks will always compare the rewards with the risk,” he said. “In modern-day Queensland, the stakes have just gone up, the risks are up.”

A recent surge in police referrals to the Crime and Misconduct Commission raises the prospect of a line of bikers losing entire fortunes under draconian drug-trafficking confiscation laws.

Half the state’s 41 clubhouses which police say were safe houses for guns, drugs, cash, and criminal conspiracies, are abandoned.

The rest have been mothballed ahead of a High Court challenge to the laws by the United Motorcycle Council of Queensland.

Detective Superintendent Mick Niland said police knew some clubs, including bikers who claimed to have cut ties with clubs, were still meeting “and we believe criminal enterprise is at work”.

“What we know is that these criminal associations are still going and we are targeting them and we are confident that successful results will occur over time.”

UMCQ spokesman Mick Kosenko said police put mistaken emphasis on clubhouses as places to organise crime and his chapter of the Rebels had given up meetings altogether.

“The main purpose of a meeting is to go for ride. What’s the point of having a meeting? It’s actually more important to get together and have a beer,” he said.

Former Gold Coast cop- turned-criminologist Terry Goldsworthy said he doubted the new anti-biker laws had done much more than make “a superficial disruption”.

Mr Pointing said traditional police methods “hadn’t been working” in the face of a “boom time for gangs” from 2007-2012, feeding on the growing rewards of the amphetamines market.

Now freed of expensive tasks such as escorting mass rides, police face a new-found test in investigating clubs driven deeper underground.

Detective Superintendent Jim Keogh said groups were “not going to turn their back on a billion-dollar industry – not without a fight”.

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Burnaby Hells Angels chapter sells clubhouse for $2.175 million

One of B.C.’s wealthiest Hells Angels chapters has sold the Burnaby clubhouse it has operated for the past seven years, The Vancouver Sun has learned.

The Nomads chapter of the notorious biker gang has met regularly at the renovated building at 3910 Grant St. since late 2006.

But on Feb. 13, the company that owned the building — Grant Street Holdings Ltd. — sold it for $2.175 million, according to land title and B.C. Assessment documents obtained by The Sun.

Corporate records list the Grant Street directors as Francesco (Frank) Amoretto, Bob Green and Gino Zumpano — all well-known members of the Nomads. A fourth Nomad, Tony Pires, had been a company director until last August, the records show.

The purchaser of the building is a numbered company with two directors that lists its address as next door to the former Hells Angels property. The property was assessed this year at $1,098,000.

Sgt. Lindsey Houghton, who speaks for the Combined Forces Special Enforcement Unit, said while the anti-gang agency is aware of the sale, he doesn’t know the reason behind it.

“We are well aware of it. We are certainly not privy as to the exact reasons why, but even though the physical location now seems to be gone — at least the one in Burnaby there — the chapter still does exist,” Houghton said. “The people still exist as a Nomads chapter.”

Houghton explained that while some Hells Angels chapters are geographic in nature, the elite Nomads chapter doesn’t have any specific boundaries in B.C.

“That is sort of the meaning of the name. They are transient and not tied to one place,” he said. “Nomads chapters don’t always have clubhouses. These guys (in Burnaby) did for a long time.”

Houghton said like all Hells Angels chapters, the Nomads hold a regular weekly meeting they call “church.”

“It will be interesting to see if they pop up in a physical location again or what they’ll do,” he said.

The Hells Angels own clubhouses in Coquitlam, Mission, Haney, Langley, East Vancouver, Kelowna and Nanaimo. But the B.C. civil forfeiture office is asking the B.C. Supreme Court to order the properties in East Van, Kelowna and Nanaimo forfeited as suspected proceeds of crime.

The Hells Angels are fighting back and have filed a suit against the government, claiming the Civil Forfeiture Act violates their Charter rights and should be scrapped.

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