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Honda NM4-02 was ready to come in market | SAGMart

Honda Motors, Japan has officially announced that Honda NM4-02 hits the production and will soon be available on sale from the coming week on Tuesday 10th June, 2014. The bike is known as “VULTUS” in the European market. NM4-02 is the new version of Honda NM4 Vultus and it is based upon the same concept. The bike has made its entry in the “NM4″ series which was first showcased in the press conference at the 30th Osaka Motorcycle Show 2014, held in Tokyo, Japan in the month of March, 2014. The model and design of this bike is pretty much influenced by the previous model of the company Honda DN-01, which was used in Valkyrie as well as it has similarities with Shotaro Kaneda’s bike from anime hit series Akira. Whats new we have in Honda NM4-02? As Honda mentioned that “the NM4 series developed under the keywords of ‘the Neo-futuristic’ and ‘COOL,’ pursuing new, unique styling.” The NM4 series was designed by keeping two important things in mind, first is the Design Concept “the Front Massive Styling” and “the cockpit position”. The low set-up cockpit and adjustable backrest will provide comfortable ride to the rider.

The bike is powered by a four-stroke, liquid-cooled OHC inline 2-cylinder engine providing 750 cc of engine displacement. The power of the engine has been sent to the 200mm rear tyres. It has 6-speed gearbox with dual-clutch auto transmission. This is the first series by Honda with this much highest specifications if compared with the mid range bikes like Integra Scooter, NC7505, CTX700, and many more.

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It would be impossible for this updated Diavel to match the impact of the original, launched only three years ago. Few bikes have been as controversial. Internet forums and magazine letters pages blazed with complaints that the Diavel was ugly, and that Ducati was betraying its sporting heritage by building a cruiser.

Despite that, Ducati’s boldness in creating the dramatically styled and cleverly engineered Diavel was rewarded when almost everybody who rode it came back smiling; marvelling at the unique way that it combined a relaxed riding position and fat back tyre with thrilling acceleration and improbably agile handling. It looked like a cruiser, performed like a superbike and has since sold respectably well, despite being far from cheap.

The updates are aimed at improving comfort and low-speed performance. That brutalist styling is retained. In fact it is exaggerated slightly, by larger air scoops on either side of the fuel tank. Other changes include an LED headlight and indicators, reshaped seat and a new exhaust system with “slash-cut” silencers.

The engine is still a 1,198cc, liquid-cooled, eight-valve V-twin, but is updated with twin spark plugs per cylinder, new camshafts and a higher compression ratio. The maximum output remains 160bhp, roughly 20bhp up on the similar unit in the new Monster 1200, but low-rev torque is improved.

Ducati claims a revised injection system gives a more refined feel. That may well be true, although I’d need a back-to-back test with the old version to confirm it. What is certain is that the revamped Diavel is not just one of the quickest bikes around but also one of the most exciting.

For such an aggressively styled bike it is rider-friendly, especially in the softest of the three riding modes, Urban, which limits power output to 100bhp. But if you press the indicator button to select Touring or Sport mode, then crack open the throttle, you’ll need to hold on tight as the Ducati thunders forward at a rate that even the firm’s super-sports 1199 Panigale would struggle to match. At 205kg dry the Diavel is heavier but its extra length helps keep the front wheel down.

The Diavel’s upright riding position is comfortable, too, at least until wind pressure intrudes, long before the maximum speed is reached. The low seat aids manoeuvrability in town.

On the launch, the only engine-related drawback was the otherwise slick six-speed gearbox’s occasional reluctance to find neutral, possibly due to the bike’s very low mileage.

If the engine is powerful and refined, the chassis impresses even more, because a bike with cruiser-like steering geometry and a huge rear tyre really shouldn’t handle so well. Inevitably the Diavel feels slightly cumbersome in the tightest of hairpins, but in most bends it’s remarkably composed.

The ride quality is very acceptable, despite the relatively short-travel suspension; and the Diavel has none of the cornering clearance limitations of many cruisers. It also has outstanding braking power, due to its stability-enhancing length allied to the ferocious bite of Brembo Monobloc calipers, allied to an excellent ABS system.

Detailing is mostly good, especially on the more expensive Carbon model tested here. This gains a carbon-fibre front mudguard and tank and seat covers, along with forged aluminium wheels and different silencers. Neat components shared by Carbon and standard Diavels include the pillion footrests and grab-rail, which retract out of sight when not required.

Those parts and the generously padded dual-seat help make the Ducati respectably practical. Its fuel capacity is a modest 17 litres but most owners will improve on the sub-100-mile range dictated by the mountainous launch route, which dragged consumption below 30mpg. At least the tank-top instrument panel now has a fuel gauge. Accessories including a screen and panniers can add versatility.

But most prospective owners will be attracted by the Diavel Carbon’s basic charms; especially by its unique blend of style, acceleration and handling ability, which goes a long way to justifying its substantial price of £16,995. These latest updates won’t make the oddball Ducati popular with every motorcyclist, even if the controversy that surrounded the original model has passed. But the Diavel is a little more refined, and every bit as exhilarating as ever.

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It would be impossible for this updated Diavel to match the impact of the original, launched only three years ago. Few bikes have been as controversial. Internet forums and magazine letters pages blazed with complaints that the Diavel was ugly, and that Ducati was betraying its sporting heritage by building a cruiser.

Despite that, Ducati’s boldness in creating the dramatically styled and cleverly engineered Diavel was rewarded when almost everybody who rode it came back smiling; marvelling at the unique way that it combined a relaxed riding position and fat back tyre with thrilling acceleration and improbably agile handling. It looked like a cruiser, performed like a superbike and has since sold respectably well, despite being far from cheap.

The updates are aimed at improving comfort and low-speed performance. That brutalist styling is retained. In fact it is exaggerated slightly, by larger air scoops on either side of the fuel tank. Other changes include an LED headlight and indicators, reshaped seat and a new exhaust system with “slash-cut” silencers.

The engine is still a 1,198cc, liquid-cooled, eight-valve V-twin, but is updated with twin spark plugs per cylinder, new camshafts and a higher compression ratio. The maximum output remains 160bhp, roughly 20bhp up on the similar unit in the new Monster 1200, but low-rev torque is improved.

Ducati claims a revised injection system gives a more refined feel. That may well be true, although I’d need a back-to-back test with the old version to confirm it. What is certain is that the revamped Diavel is not just one of the quickest bikes around but also one of the most exciting.

For such an aggressively styled bike it is rider-friendly, especially in the softest of the three riding modes, Urban, which limits power output to 100bhp. But if you press the indicator button to select Touring or Sport mode, then crack open the throttle, you’ll need to hold on tight as the Ducati thunders forward at a rate that even the firm’s super-sports 1199 Panigale would struggle to match. At 205kg dry the Diavel is heavier but its extra length helps keep the front wheel down.

The Diavel’s upright riding position is comfortable, too, at least until wind pressure intrudes, long before the maximum speed is reached. The low seat aids manoeuvrability in town.

On the launch, the only engine-related drawback was the otherwise slick six-speed gearbox’s occasional reluctance to find neutral, possibly due to the bike’s very low mileage.

If the engine is powerful and refined, the chassis impresses even more, because a bike with cruiser-like steering geometry and a huge rear tyre really shouldn’t handle so well. Inevitably the Diavel feels slightly cumbersome in the tightest of hairpins, but in most bends it’s remarkably composed.

The ride quality is very acceptable, despite the relatively short-travel suspension; and the Diavel has none of the cornering clearance limitations of many cruisers. It also has outstanding braking power, due to its stability-enhancing length allied to the ferocious bite of Brembo Monobloc calipers, allied to an excellent ABS system.

Detailing is mostly good, especially on the more expensive Carbon model tested here. This gains a carbon-fibre front mudguard and tank and seat covers, along with forged aluminium wheels and different silencers. Neat components shared by Carbon and standard Diavels include the pillion footrests and grab-rail, which retract out of sight when not required.

Those parts and the generously padded dual-seat help make the Ducati respectably practical. Its fuel capacity is a modest 17 litres but most owners will improve on the sub-100-mile range dictated by the mountainous launch route, which dragged consumption below 30mpg. At least the tank-top instrument panel now has a fuel gauge. Accessories including a screen and panniers can add versatility.

But most prospective owners will be attracted by the Diavel Carbon’s basic charms; especially by its unique blend of style, acceleration and handling ability, which goes a long way to justifying its substantial price of £16,995. These latest updates won’t make the oddball Ducati popular with every motorcyclist, even if the controversy that surrounded the original model has passed. But the Diavel is a little more refined, and every bit as exhilarating as ever.

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Custom+Harley

Custom+Harley

Custom+Harley

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rsv4

rsv4

 

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 susuki gsx 100 2014


susuki gsx 100 2014

susuki gsx 100 2014

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gsx1100

gsx1100

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suzuki ts

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The Harley Davidson Street 750 has been released in India

The Harley Davidson Street 750 has been released in India

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Gixxer for a Biker – The New Indian Express

The latest bike from the Suzuki stable is a beautifully styled creation targeting younger, college-going lot along with young executives. Many of its features give it a street presence that’s currently unparalleled in its class.

The Gixxer is, in fact, the best-looking motorcycle in the affordable 150cc category. According to Suzuki, the Gixxer’s engine is all new; it uses new piston and combustion chamber design, lighter and more slippery components; and it doesn’t even sport the same bore and stroke values as the GS. The Gixxer’s engine also uses SEP or Suzuki Eco Performance—a technology Suzuki says enhances fuel economy without eating into the power stakes. It is a single-cylinder engine with a single overhead cam operating two valves. The power or torque figures for the motorcycle haven’t been revealed yet, but according to the Japanese two-wheeler giant (which hasn’t acquired that status in India yet), the Gixxer’s engine will have best-in-class performance.

The frame for the Gixxer is all new as well, and along with plastic panels for body work (including the fuel tank), Suzuki says the Gixxer is the lightest motorcycle in its class. Given the claims on engine performance and weight, this 155cc motorcycle should certainly set a new performance benchmark in the affordable 150cc product category. Getting back to the frame—the Gixxer uses a diamond type frame which is suspended on beefy 41mm front forks and a preload adjustable monoshock at the rear. The swing arm is a box section one for added rigidity.

The Gixxer’s braking duties are handled by a single disc setup from Bybre at the front and a drum setup at the rear. The bike also sports a 100/70 section 17-inch tubeless tyre at the front and a fat 140/60 x 17 tubeless rubber at the rear. It has a high set and wide handlebar that feels natural to hold. The seat is low and along with footpegs which are rearset but not uncomfortably so, the Gixxer should make for a comfortable motorcycle both to ride in the city and over long distances. One can also grip the bike well, thanks to a thoughtfully shaped fuel tank which has knee recesses that a majority of riders will find usable.

The Gixxer will be launched in July in the price range of Rs 70,000-75,000.

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Vespa 946 Prova

Vespa 946 Prova

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1950 triumph tiger

1950 triumph tiger

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